How to Keep Your Financial Aid

Don’t lose your aid

You’ve met the eligibility requirements. You’ve completed your FAFSA. And your financial aid has been credited to your account. Now what?

Maintain your enrollment

Any change to your enrollment may result in a change to your financial aid eligibility. This includes:

If any of these occur, you may be asked to return money you’ve already received, and may not receive money you’re expecting.

For most types of financial aid, you need to be enrolled at least half time during any semester you’re receiving aid:

  • Undergraduate: 6 credit hours
  • Graduate: 4 credit hours

Note that waitlist hours aren’t counted when determining enrollment status—only classes you’re actually registered for will count.

Exceptions to the half-time rule

Federal Pell Grants

The amount of your Pell grant is determined by your enrollment status at the end of the 100% tuition refund period, so be sure to finalize your schedule before the end of this period.

Frank O’Bannon Grants

If you’re receiving a Frank O’Bannon Grant, you’re required to be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours through the 25% tuition refund period . If you were enrolled in 12 credit hours and received your award, then dropped below 12 credit hours, the grant will be removed from your account. This may create a balance on your bursar account that must be repaid.

21st Century Scholarship

If you’re receiving a 21st Century Scholarship, you’re required to be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours through the 25% tuition refund period. If you were enrolled in 12 credit hours and received your award, then dropped below 12 credit hours, the grant will be removed from your account. This may create a balance on your bursar account that must be repaid.

Make satisfactory academic progress

We review your academic progress at least once a year. It’s determined by your enrollment in all previous terms (including those in which you withdrew completely from classes), whether or not you received financial aid.

If you are a nondegree student who is eligible for financial aid, you are expected to meet the same standards as an undergraduate student in order to keep your aid.

You must meet the following requirements to make satisfactory academic progress (SAP):

How we monitor your academic progress

Each spring after final grades have been posted, the Office of Student Financial Services reviews each undergraduate and graduate financial aid application for satisfactory academic progress. You’ll be evaluated after you submit your FAFSA or after you apply for a private loan or Federal Direct PLUS Loan. You may also request a SAP review at the end of any semester you’re enrolled.

What happens if you don’t make satisfactory academic progress?

We’ll notify you if you’re making unsatisfactory academic progress. You can also see your status in One.IU. If you’ve been flagged as making unsatisfactory progress, you can file an academic progress appeal.

How repeating courses affects your aid

If you repeat a course more than once in which you received a letter grade of D– or higher, federal regulations say that repeated course can’t be included in your enrollment status when we calculate your federal financial aid eligibility.

If you’re enrolled in 12 credit hours during which you repeat a previously passed 3 credit hour course for the second time, only nine of your credit hours can be used to calculate your financial aid eligibility. Your enrollment will be reported as three-quarter time rather than full time, which may affect your federal grants and loans.

Submitting an academic progress appeal does not guarantee approval or aid eligibility.

If your appeal is approved

Check the Student Center to make sure you have no other financial aid to-do items. If nothing is listed, you can expect to receive a notification of your financial aid package within the next 10 business days.

If your appeal is denied

You must reestablish your eligibility to receive financial aid. Check your email for additional information. If your appeal was denied due to completion rate or GPA issues, you may become eligible by taking classes and paying for them on your own in order to meet minimum SAP requirements.